Ann Blyth in Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid (1948)

(Source: normajeanebaker, via mermaids-and-anchors)

porcelaindoll-xo:

Can we take a minute and talk about this please?

You see the lovely women in the first image. Her name is Hannah Mermaid. (Or Hannah Fraser) . She’s a professional mermaid. She makes her living preforming and entertaining people in a number of ways. She’s also an artist and a model. She makes all of her fins herself. She’s an amazing and inspiring women.  I’ll leave a few links at the bottom so you guys can check out her website. 

The image to right really really really bugs me. Here is a few reasons why.

  • They cut out the water mark. They removed any credit from the image other than her handmade fin.
  • The model (Hannah) has asked a number of times on facebook on a number of mermaid groups to remove the image of Khaleesi.  Faerie Magazine has even removed the image because Hannah asked.
  • The image was edited without the models consent.
  • Khaleesi’s head has been SHOPPED onto Hannahs Body and fin. 

In short, Stop reblogging and reposting the image of “Khaleesi”. The model doesn’t like the image. When you do repost it, you are supporting art thieves 

Hannah’s amazing websites: 

(via mermaids-and-anchors)

flambecircustheatre:

Phew, secret project had its debut this weekend at the UK Face and Body Art Convention. Our mermaid living table made a huge splash with the guests! Along with this we provided stilt walking characters, bubbleologists and a 2 person glow show complete with pixel poi finale.

flambecircustheatre:

Phew, secret project had its debut this weekend at the UK Face and Body Art Convention. Our mermaid living table made a huge splash with the guests! Along with this we provided stilt walking characters, bubbleologists and a 2 person glow show complete with pixel poi finale.

(via mermaids-and-anchors)

pink-lushh:

I couldn’t resist! I had to draw myself as a mermaid for this month lol Halloween is my favourite holiday!! I LOVE dressing up

pink-lushh:

I couldn’t resist! I had to draw myself as a mermaid for this month lol Halloween is my favourite holiday!! I LOVE dressing up

(Source: , via flippinyourfins)

crystallineclears:

mayordamoose:

zillah975:

konora:

gifsboom:

Man Saves a Shark

look at that man. When the shark starts thrashing around he just lets go and calmly takes a step back and waits for it to be done. Then it’s back to work. What a badass.

OH MY GOD

SO MUCH LOVE

SAVE ALL THE THINGS

EVEN THE POINTY BITEY ONES

That is really badass. Awesome.

im so happy right now that just made my day

(via silk-moon)

Anonymous Asked:
You should really credit the mermaid photos before posting them. Us mermaids work very hard for publicity and stealing our images without credit is not appreciated in the least. It is simply wrong and robs us of valuable connections. Please credit!

mermaids-and-anchors:

sea-glass-siren:

beccas-rp-help:

I’m not sure if this is serious or not? If it is serious - please know that I got all of these photos off of a website called weheartit.com All of these images have been shared by hundreds of people, so tracking down the owner is not possible. I also already have a reminder on my blog that I take no credit for any of the photos. 

Just because other people are doing it doesn’t make it okay. How would you feel if this happened to one of your photos?

Weheartit steals pictures. Also just saying “I take no credit.” means ABSOLUTELY NOTHING. You should either know the source or don’t use the photo. Simple as that.

AMEN! I tell people this all the time! Just because others do it DOES NOT MAKE IT OKAY. The best thing you can do is either A) Get photos directly from the source- official pages or social media of the photographer, model, character (mermaid/pirate/fairy/ect) so you know who to credit B) Do a reverse image search on Google to find the owner so you can give proper credit. If you don’t know who the photo belongs to, or who to give credit to, DON’T POST IT. It’s really that simple! “Credit to google images’ “Credit to image owner” or “I take no credit” is not okay. Sites like WeHeartIt and Pinterest pretty much never give credit, so it’s best just not to get images from there unless you plan on reverse image searching it to find out who it belongs to. 

Thank you for being open to answers about this issue! I know the answers seem like we might be irritated at you, but really it’s the hundreds of people who take our images and don’t credit us that makes the whole issue very touchy for mermaids, as well as artists of all kinds. 

rainamermaid:

I think most of these were made for me by @mermaids-and-anchors

I only made the top one.

:)

www,halifaxmermaids.com

Mermaids and Dreams In Visual Culture

rainamermaid:

A great read on visual depictions of mermaids across time and cultures. Great for the history/literacy mermaid buffs out there. I researched a lot of similar materials for the workshops I run at our local multicultural festival where I present the history of mermaids. It is so awesome how there is literally a mermaid mythos for every culture. While the stories often change it is a persistent female with power over water that unites them all. Sedna is one of my favourite myths, with her Inuk tattoos adorning her face, her power over sea-creatures, and her rebellious spirit. I love seeing the Inuk created artwork of her that my friends send from Nunavut. Ningyo’s are another amazing story. Sometimes with the face of a Geisha and the body of a fish. Catch one and keep it and a tsunami may be heading your way. Suvannamaccha- the Hindu mermaid, stealing rocks from a causeway evading a man who would fall in love with her. Or, like Mermaid Mutiny, our Mikmaq local mermaid also known as Sabawaelnu- the halfway people. With their mighty power over storms.

It is really something to see how the mermaid myth has prevailed through cultures and time. It does make it hard to believe that they arent real with stories reaching every end of the earth. I’ve only mentioned a few, and this article doesn’t mention them all either.

When we embody mermaids as a character, we draw on all these beautiful stories, that oral tradition, and pass it on to a new generation. I love sharing the cultural stories at the festival and seeing kid’s eyes light up when they find a mermaid persona from their own culture. Isn’t that something? Mermaids cross all bridges between people. Young, old, men, women, different lands and different times.

Anyway, this is a GREAT read. I think I’m going to start featuring cultural depictions of mermaids in separate posts. The history will astound you!

(via mermaids-and-anchors)

twerpy-fireball:

mermaidiona:

rainamermaid:

twerpy-fireball:

themermaidboy:

rainamermaid:

mermaidiona:

twerpy-fireball:

mermaids-and-anchors:




Congratulations to Mermaid Bonnie, her merbaby Esther Grace.
facebook
youtube







I mean yay babies but like…..http://shamelessmag.com/blog/entry/not-your-fashion-dots-the-continuous-appropriatio/






Wow, you’re really shaming a beautiful mermaid and her baby because you see rhinestones on the forehead as cultural appropriation? Which is ridiculous, by the way. It’s not. Besides wearing bindis not being cultural appropriation, she’s not even wearing an actual bindi.
Even if it WAS an actual, bindi, which it’s not-"To say that this particular bindi can only be worn by Indians is racist. To say that variations of it are inappropriate for anyone not associated with India is ridiculous. Is it feasible to think that Indians design a fashion accessory and the rest of the world is not allowed to engage in it’s beauty? I don’t think so. Millions of unmarried Indian girls wear the bindi styles in question. It’s been seen on small babies and children in India as an accessory. In the Hindu tradition and history, a tilak bindi is worn as a symbol of protection, a sort of homage to the third eye. It is not a strict marriage symbol and has nothing to do with sparkles, fancy shapes and designs or colors. It is not strictly for women.” (source)Get off your high horse. 

Rhinestones are often used by mermaids to channel a water motif. They are not worn like Bindi’s nor are they bindi’s. They symbolize water droplets, mermaid scales, and are an adornment that furthers the idea of a mythical creature. Mermaids in many depictions can be seen with similar items adorning their head and forehead. This is like getting mad at someone because they are wearing feather earrings, when you don’t want someone to wear a feather headress.
Sometimes tumblr goes way too far in their social justice bubble.

are you fucking kidding me? Someone is saying a woman doesn’t deserve congratulations on having a child because she wore jewelry on her forehead? Sometimes I hate this website.

Woahhh hey now that’s not what I said! I spread info about her on a post about her baby, I didn’t say she didn’t deserve congratulations/a family/a healthy baby/etc. Bringing attention to culture appropriation and racism is not uncalled for or inappropriate because someone just had a baby, come on now.

Sure, when you aren’t promoting ignorance and labelling something cultural appropriation when it isn’t. Rhinestones in a line across the forhead (like a circlet) \=\ bindi. Just like, a tattoo on the hand in the shape of a flower \=\ henna. Or a single feather woven into hair or worn as earrings \=\ head dress. Hate swings both ways, and your post encourages hate of someone based on YOUR ignorance of what Bindis are and aren’t. It also UNDERMINDS actual cases of cultural appropriation- and makes it harder to educate and call out actual issues.
Because you are uncomfortable with it/ uneducated/ offended, does not make something racist or appropriation. And you better start adding a whole heck of a lot of us to that list of yours. Because adorning our faces with rhinestones both along the eye brow line, next to eyes, and across the forhead especially in a circlet style is not only used by professional mermaids dating back 100 years, but appears in art depicting mermaids of all nations for 1000s.





twerpy-fireball:

I am not shaming her in any way, no need to get so defensive. Constructive criticism is not inherently negative. I was actually coming from a pretty positive place until she ignored the issue I brought up. I also didn’t say that rhinestones=bindis? I said that there seem to be some racial implications behind white girls wearing rhinestones between their eyes. I realize that whether bindis are/aren’t appropriative is debateable to actual Hindus, but like…no one’s going to be upset by you NOT wearing something? Considering the amount of Hindu women who are upset by accessories like this, it seems better to play it safe and just…not wear it. I don’t know why people get so offended by such a simple request.
Idk if you realize this, but that article was written by a white woman, who doesn’t experience racism. I’m genuinely not trying to sound self righteous or blunt, tone is just hard to convey over the internet & I don’t have the energy to rephrase everything rn.

So you argue that it’s offensive to Hindus and that’s why it’s such a big deal, yet you overlook that the article I quoted was written by a Hindu, but because she’s white she doesn’t understand the issue? Just, wow. Either way I quoted the article because it put my feeling into words better than I could. I also agree with everything Raina said. Labeling something cultural appropriation when it isn’t is encouraging hate of something based on ignorance. That is helpful to no one. 

I’m sorry I didn’t make myself clear enough before: I am not interested in what you deem racist/not racist unless you are an actual Hindu of color. When I bring up concerns about racism towards Hindu fans, I’m talking specifically about those of color, as white Hindus do not experience or understand racism.
Raina- While the history of forehead jewelry wrt historical depictions of mermaids is very interesting, that does not cancel out the recent trend of white women wearing bindis for superficial reasons, or slapping a rhinestone on their foreheads and pretending it’s a bindi. Because of this trend, a white person placing a rhinestone between their eyebrows has a lot of racial implications and might alienate a lot of potential fans. I did not mean to state that this is cut and dry appropriation/racism, as I’m not Hindu and that’s not my place. I’m sorry I phrased it that way, I tried to avoid that but I’m not very articulate. Oh also if you remember the article/book/whatever about mermaid sightings & jewelry would you mind sending it my way? That seems like a really fun read

"When I bring up concerns about racism towards Hindu fans, I’m talking specifically about those of color, as white Hindus do not experience or understand racism." 
WOW. Just, wow. I seriously can’t even. You can’t argue with these kind of people. I’m done.

twerpy-fireball:

mermaidiona:

rainamermaid:

twerpy-fireball:

themermaidboy:

rainamermaid:

mermaidiona:

twerpy-fireball:

mermaids-and-anchors:

Congratulations to Mermaid Bonnie, her merbaby Esther Grace.

facebook

youtube

I mean yay babies but like…..

http://shamelessmag.com/blog/entry/not-your-fashion-dots-the-continuous-appropriatio/

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Wow, you’re really shaming a beautiful mermaid and her baby because you see rhinestones on the forehead as cultural appropriation? Which is ridiculous, by the way. It’s not. Besides wearing bindis not being cultural appropriation, she’s not even wearing an actual bindi.

Even if it WAS an actual, bindi, which it’s not-

"To say that this particular bindi can only be worn by Indians is racist. To say that variations of it are inappropriate for anyone not associated with India is ridiculous. Is it feasible to think that Indians design a fashion accessory and the rest of the world is not allowed to engage in it’s beauty? I don’t think so. Millions of unmarried Indian girls wear the bindi styles in question. It’s been seen on small babies and children in India as an accessory. 

In the Hindu tradition and history, a tilak bindi is worn as a symbol of protection, a sort of homage to the third eye. It is not a strict marriage symbol and has nothing to do with sparkles, fancy shapes and designs or colors. It is not strictly for women.” (source)

Get off your high horse. 

Rhinestones are often used by mermaids to channel a water motif. They are not worn like Bindi’s nor are they bindi’s. They symbolize water droplets, mermaid scales, and are an adornment that furthers the idea of a mythical creature. Mermaids in many depictions can be seen with similar items adorning their head and forehead. This is like getting mad at someone because they are wearing feather earrings, when you don’t want someone to wear a feather headress.

Sometimes tumblr goes way too far in their social justice bubble.

are you fucking kidding me? Someone is saying a woman doesn’t deserve congratulations on having a child because she wore jewelry on her forehead? Sometimes I hate this website.

Woahhh hey now that’s not what I said! I spread info about her on a post about her baby, I didn’t say she didn’t deserve congratulations/a family/a healthy baby/etc. Bringing attention to culture appropriation and racism is not uncalled for or inappropriate because someone just had a baby, come on now.

Sure, when you aren’t promoting ignorance and labelling something cultural appropriation when it isn’t. Rhinestones in a line across the forhead (like a circlet) \=\ bindi. Just like, a tattoo on the hand in the shape of a flower \=\ henna. Or a single feather woven into hair or worn as earrings \=\ head dress. Hate swings both ways, and your post encourages hate of someone based on YOUR ignorance of what Bindis are and aren’t. It also UNDERMINDS actual cases of cultural appropriation- and makes it harder to educate and call out actual issues.

Because you are uncomfortable with it/ uneducated/ offended, does not make something racist or appropriation. And you better start adding a whole heck of a lot of us to that list of yours. Because adorning our faces with rhinestones both along the eye brow line, next to eyes, and across the forhead especially in a circlet style is not only used by professional mermaids dating back 100 years, but appears in art depicting mermaids of all nations for 1000s.

twerpy-fireball:

I am not shaming her in any way, no need to get so defensive. Constructive criticism is not inherently negative. I was actually coming from a pretty positive place until she ignored the issue I brought up. I also didn’t say that rhinestones=bindis? I said that there seem to be some racial implications behind white girls wearing rhinestones between their eyes. I realize that whether bindis are/aren’t appropriative is debateable to actual Hindus, but like…no one’s going to be upset by you NOT wearing something? Considering the amount of Hindu women who are upset by accessories like this, it seems better to play it safe and just…not wear it. I don’t know why people get so offended by such a simple request.


Idk if you realize this, but that article was written by a white woman, who doesn’t experience racism. 

I’m genuinely not trying to sound self righteous or blunt, tone is just hard to convey over the internet & I don’t have the energy to rephrase everything rn.

So you argue that it’s offensive to Hindus and that’s why it’s such a big deal, yet you overlook that the article I quoted was written by a Hindu, but because she’s white she doesn’t understand the issue? Just, wow. Either way I quoted the article because it put my feeling into words better than I could. I also agree with everything Raina said. Labeling something cultural appropriation when it isn’t is encouraging hate of something based on ignorance. That is helpful to no one. 

I’m sorry I didn’t make myself clear enough before: I am not interested in what you deem racist/not racist unless you are an actual Hindu of color. When I bring up concerns about racism towards Hindu fans, I’m talking specifically about those of color, as white Hindus do not experience or understand racism.

Raina- While the history of forehead jewelry wrt historical depictions of mermaids is very interesting, that does not cancel out the recent trend of white women wearing bindis for superficial reasons, or slapping a rhinestone on their foreheads and pretending it’s a bindi. Because of this trend, a white person placing a rhinestone between their eyebrows has a lot of racial implications and might alienate a lot of potential fans. I did not mean to state that this is cut and dry appropriation/racism, as I’m not Hindu and that’s not my place. I’m sorry I phrased it that way, I tried to avoid that but I’m not very articulate. 

Oh also if you remember the article/book/whatever about mermaid sightings & jewelry would you mind sending it my way? That seems like a really fun read


"When I bring up concerns about racism towards Hindu fans, I’m talking specifically about those of color, as white Hindus do not experience or understand racism." 

WOW. Just, wow. I seriously can’t even. You can’t argue with these kind of people. I’m done.

rainamermaid:

twerpy-fireball:

themermaidboy:

rainamermaid:

mermaidiona:

twerpy-fireball:

mermaids-and-anchors:




Congratulations to Mermaid Bonnie, her merbaby Esther Grace.
facebook
youtube







I mean yay babies but like…..http://shamelessmag.com/blog/entry/not-your-fashion-dots-the-continuous-appropriatio/






Wow, you’re really shaming a beautiful mermaid and her baby because you see rhinestones on the forehead as cultural appropriation? Which is ridiculous, by the way. It’s not. Besides wearing bindis not being cultural appropriation, she’s not even wearing an actual bindi.
Even if it WAS an actual, bindi, which it’s not-"To say that this particular bindi can only be worn by Indians is racist. To say that variations of it are inappropriate for anyone not associated with India is ridiculous. Is it feasible to think that Indians design a fashion accessory and the rest of the world is not allowed to engage in it’s beauty? I don’t think so. Millions of unmarried Indian girls wear the bindi styles in question. It’s been seen on small babies and children in India as an accessory. In the Hindu tradition and history, a tilak bindi is worn as a symbol of protection, a sort of homage to the third eye. It is not a strict marriage symbol and has nothing to do with sparkles, fancy shapes and designs or colors. It is not strictly for women.” (source)Get off your high horse. 

Rhinestones are often used by mermaids to channel a water motif. They are not worn like Bindi’s nor are they bindi’s. They symbolize water droplets, mermaid scales, and are an adornment that furthers the idea of a mythical creature. Mermaids in many depictions can be seen with similar items adorning their head and forehead. This is like getting mad at someone because they are wearing feather earrings, when you don’t want someone to wear a feather headress.
Sometimes tumblr goes way too far in their social justice bubble.

are you fucking kidding me? Someone is saying a woman doesn’t deserve congratulations on having a child because she wore jewelry on her forehead? Sometimes I hate this website.

Woahhh hey now that’s not what I said! I spread info about her on a post about her baby, I didn’t say she didn’t deserve congratulations/a family/a healthy baby/etc. Bringing attention to culture appropriation and racism is not uncalled for or inappropriate because someone just had a baby, come on now.

Sure, when you aren’t promoting ignorance and labelling something cultural appropriation when it isn’t. Rhinestones in a line across the forhead (like a circlet) \=\ bindi. Just like, a tattoo on the hand in the shape of a flower \=\ henna. Or a single feather woven into hair or worn as earrings \=\ head dress. Hate swings both ways, and your post encourages hate of someone based on YOUR ignorance of what Bindis are and aren’t. It also UNDERMINDS actual cases of cultural appropriation- and makes it harder to educate and call out actual issues.
Because you are uncomfortable with it/ uneducated/ offended, does not make something racist or appropriation. And you better start adding a whole heck of a lot of us to that list of yours. Because adorning our faces with rhinestones both along the eye brow line, next to eyes, and across the forhead especially in a circlet style is not only used by professional mermaids dating back 100 years, but appears in art depicting mermaids of all nations for 1000s.





twerpy-fireball:

I am not shaming her in any way, no need to get so defensive. Constructive criticism is not inherently negative. I was actually coming from a pretty positive place until she ignored the issue I brought up. I also didn’t say that rhinestones=bindis? I said that there seem to be some racial implications behind white girls wearing rhinestones between their eyes. I realize that whether bindis are/aren’t appropriative is debateable to actual Hindus, but like…no one’s going to be upset by you NOT wearing something? Considering the amount of Hindu women who are upset by accessories like this, it seems better to play it safe and just…not wear it. I don’t know why people get so offended by such a simple request.
Idk if you realize this, but that article was written by a white woman, who doesn’t experience racism. I’m genuinely not trying to sound self righteous or blunt, tone is just hard to convey over the internet & I don’t have the energy to rephrase everything rn.

So you argue that it’s offensive to Hindus and that’s why it’s such a big deal, yet you overlook that the article I quoted was written by a Hindu, but because she’s white she doesn’t understand the issue? Just, wow. Either way I quoted the article because it put my feeling into words better than I could. I also agree with everything Raina said. Labeling something cultural appropriation when it isn’t is encouraging hate of something based on ignorance. That is helpful to no one. 

rainamermaid:

twerpy-fireball:

themermaidboy:

rainamermaid:

mermaidiona:

twerpy-fireball:

mermaids-and-anchors:

Congratulations to Mermaid Bonnie, her merbaby Esther Grace.

facebook

youtube

I mean yay babies but like…..

http://shamelessmag.com/blog/entry/not-your-fashion-dots-the-continuous-appropriatio/

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Wow, you’re really shaming a beautiful mermaid and her baby because you see rhinestones on the forehead as cultural appropriation? Which is ridiculous, by the way. It’s not. Besides wearing bindis not being cultural appropriation, she’s not even wearing an actual bindi.

Even if it WAS an actual, bindi, which it’s not-

"To say that this particular bindi can only be worn by Indians is racist. To say that variations of it are inappropriate for anyone not associated with India is ridiculous. Is it feasible to think that Indians design a fashion accessory and the rest of the world is not allowed to engage in it’s beauty? I don’t think so. Millions of unmarried Indian girls wear the bindi styles in question. It’s been seen on small babies and children in India as an accessory. 

In the Hindu tradition and history, a tilak bindi is worn as a symbol of protection, a sort of homage to the third eye. It is not a strict marriage symbol and has nothing to do with sparkles, fancy shapes and designs or colors. It is not strictly for women.” (source)

Get off your high horse. 

Rhinestones are often used by mermaids to channel a water motif. They are not worn like Bindi’s nor are they bindi’s. They symbolize water droplets, mermaid scales, and are an adornment that furthers the idea of a mythical creature. Mermaids in many depictions can be seen with similar items adorning their head and forehead. This is like getting mad at someone because they are wearing feather earrings, when you don’t want someone to wear a feather headress.

Sometimes tumblr goes way too far in their social justice bubble.

are you fucking kidding me? Someone is saying a woman doesn’t deserve congratulations on having a child because she wore jewelry on her forehead? Sometimes I hate this website.

Woahhh hey now that’s not what I said! I spread info about her on a post about her baby, I didn’t say she didn’t deserve congratulations/a family/a healthy baby/etc. Bringing attention to culture appropriation and racism is not uncalled for or inappropriate because someone just had a baby, come on now.

Sure, when you aren’t promoting ignorance and labelling something cultural appropriation when it isn’t. Rhinestones in a line across the forhead (like a circlet) \=\ bindi. Just like, a tattoo on the hand in the shape of a flower \=\ henna. Or a single feather woven into hair or worn as earrings \=\ head dress. Hate swings both ways, and your post encourages hate of someone based on YOUR ignorance of what Bindis are and aren’t. It also UNDERMINDS actual cases of cultural appropriation- and makes it harder to educate and call out actual issues.

Because you are uncomfortable with it/ uneducated/ offended, does not make something racist or appropriation. And you better start adding a whole heck of a lot of us to that list of yours. Because adorning our faces with rhinestones both along the eye brow line, next to eyes, and across the forhead especially in a circlet style is not only used by professional mermaids dating back 100 years, but appears in art depicting mermaids of all nations for 1000s.

twerpy-fireball:

I am not shaming her in any way, no need to get so defensive. Constructive criticism is not inherently negative. I was actually coming from a pretty positive place until she ignored the issue I brought up. I also didn’t say that rhinestones=bindis? I said that there seem to be some racial implications behind white girls wearing rhinestones between their eyes. I realize that whether bindis are/aren’t appropriative is debateable to actual Hindus, but like…no one’s going to be upset by you NOT wearing something? Considering the amount of Hindu women who are upset by accessories like this, it seems better to play it safe and just…not wear it. I don’t know why people get so offended by such a simple request.


Idk if you realize this, but that article was written by a white woman, who doesn’t experience racism. 

I’m genuinely not trying to sound self righteous or blunt, tone is just hard to convey over the internet & I don’t have the energy to rephrase everything rn.

So you argue that it’s offensive to Hindus and that’s why it’s such a big deal, yet you overlook that the article I quoted was written by a Hindu, but because she’s white she doesn’t understand the issue? Just, wow. Either way I quoted the article because it put my feeling into words better than I could. I also agree with everything Raina said. Labeling something cultural appropriation when it isn’t is encouraging hate of something based on ignorance. That is helpful to no one. 

twerpy-fireball:

mermaids-and-anchors:




Congratulations to Mermaid Bonnie, her merbaby Esther Grace.
facebook
youtube







I mean yay babies but like…..http://shamelessmag.com/blog/entry/not-your-fashion-dots-the-continuous-appropriatio/






Wow, you’re really shaming a beautiful mermaid and her baby because you see rhinestones on the forehead as cultural appropriation? Which is ridiculous, by the way. It’s not. Besides wearing bindis not being cultural appropriation, she’s not even wearing an actual bindi. 
Even if it WAS an actual, bindi, which it’s not-"To say that this particular bindi can only be worn by Indians is racist. To say that variations of it are inappropriate for anyone not associated with India is ridiculous. Is it feasible to think that Indians design a fashion accessory and the rest of the world is not allowed to engage in it’s beauty? I don’t think so. Millions of unmarried Indian girls wear the bindi styles in question. It’s been seen on small babies and children in India as an accessory. In the Hindu tradition and history, a tilak bindi is worn as a symbol of protection, a sort of homage to the third eye. It is not a strict marriage symbol and has nothing to do with sparkles, fancy shapes and designs or colors. It is not strictly for women.” (source)Get off your high horse. 

twerpy-fireball:

mermaids-and-anchors:

Congratulations to Mermaid Bonnie, her merbaby Esther Grace.

facebook

youtube

I mean yay babies but like…..

http://shamelessmag.com/blog/entry/not-your-fashion-dots-the-continuous-appropriatio/

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

Wow, you’re really shaming a beautiful mermaid and her baby because you see rhinestones on the forehead as cultural appropriation? Which is ridiculous, by the way. It’s not. Besides wearing bindis not being cultural appropriation, she’s not even wearing an actual bindi.

Even if it WAS an actual, bindi, which it’s not-

"To say that this particular bindi can only be worn by Indians is racist. To say that variations of it are inappropriate for anyone not associated with India is ridiculous. Is it feasible to think that Indians design a fashion accessory and the rest of the world is not allowed to engage in it’s beauty? I don’t think so. Millions of unmarried Indian girls wear the bindi styles in question. It’s been seen on small babies and children in India as an accessory. 

In the Hindu tradition and history, a tilak bindi is worn as a symbol of protection, a sort of homage to the third eye. It is not a strict marriage symbol and has nothing to do with sparkles, fancy shapes and designs or colors. It is not strictly for women.” (source)

Get off your high horse.